Mesa, Arizona — At this time, Pacific Coast Hospice facilities do not have a confirmed case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus. At no time have our emergency operations been disrupted, and we continue to provide all levels of care to our community. Pacific Coast Hospice has taken all appropriate and necessary precautions for the safety and well-being of our community. In compliance with our infectious disease protocols, we will remain vigilant and continue to follow the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Arizona Department of Health guidelines.

To contain the spread of a contagious illness, public health authorities rely on many strategies. Two of these strategies are isolation and quarantine. Both are common practices in public health, and both aim to control exposure to infected or potentially infected persons. Both may be undertaken voluntarily or compelled by public health authorities. The two strategies differ in that isolation applies to persons who are known to have an illness, and quarantine applies to those who have been exposed to an illness but who may or may not become ill.

Isolation refers to the separation of persons who have a specific infectious illness from those who are healthy and the restriction of their movement to stop the spread of that illness. Isolation allows for the focused delivery of specialized health care to people who are ill, and it protects healthy people from getting sick. People in isolation may be cared for in their homes, in hospitals, or in designated healthcare facilities. Isolation is a standard procedure used in hospitals today for patients with tuberculosis (TB) and certain other infectious diseases. In most cases, isolation is voluntary; however, many levels of government (federal, state, and local) have basic authority to compel isolation of sick people to protect the public.

Quarantine refers to the separation and restriction of movement of persons who, while not yet ill, have been exposed to an infectious agent and therefore may become infectious. Quarantine of exposed persons is a public health strategy, like isolation, that is intended to stop the spread of infectious disease. Quarantine is medically very effective in protecting the public from disease.

While the immediate risk of this new virus to the American public is believed to be low at this time, everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat: It’s currently flu and respiratory disease season and CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine, taking everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed.

We are working closely with state, local, tribal, and territorial partners, as well as public health partners, to respond to this public health threat.

For further information about 2019 COVID-19 please visit the CDC website at:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html